Wildlife Handling and Chemical Immobilization for Wildlife Professionals

This 3-day class is intended for wildlife agency personnel and other wildlife professionals. Taught by Dr. Mark Johnson of Global Wildlife Resources, it will take place October 22-24, with an optional free Monday workshop on October 21.

Classroom lecture and hands-on labs focus on the needs of researchers and managers to understand the skills and equipment associated with wildlife capture, physical restraint, and chemical immobilization. The course also covers each aspect of animal handling such a radio-collaring, weighing, sample collection and patient monitoring.

Includes course notebook and labs each day. Participants  receive a Certificate of Training upon course completion.

Student examining wolf during lab.

Student examining wolf during lab.

Register / More Information: Complete this APPLICATION and return to info@wolfhaven.org.

Course content includes:

  • Five-step preparation for field operations
  • Legal responsibilities
  • Professionalism
  • Drug delivery systems
  • Immobilizing drugs
  • Patient monitoring
  • Marking sampling
  • Veterinary emergencies
  • Euthanasia
  • Human safety
  • Ethical issues
  • Honoring each animal through equipment and techniques

About Global Wildlife Resources, Inc.
Global Wildlife Resources, Inc. (GWR) is a progressive organization dedicated to supporting wildlife professionals and bringing honor, care, and respect to those animals affected by research and management by:

  1. Promoting and improving animal welfare (in a non-prescriptive manner) in programs and activities relating to wildlife research and management.
  2. Teaching the highest quality courses in wildlife capture, chemical immobilization and handling.
  3. Providing professional preparation and field assistance with wildlife captures, transport, and disease investigations.

 

Native Plant Appreciation Week April 21-27, 2019

by Marinka Major, Wolf Haven International

 

Wolf Haven mounded prairie

Wolf Haven mounded prairie

Native plants find sanctuary at Wolf Haven where 37 acres of rolling, grassy Mima Mounds harbor dozens of rare prairie plants. Prairies have a diverse population of native plants that provide food to many animals, some that only live in prairie ecosystems such as the Mazama pocket gopher, Thomomys mazama and the Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly, Euphydryas editha taylori.

Controlled burn at Wolf Haven

Controlled burn at Wolf Haven

Native prairie plants are fire adapted and thrive in prairies that experience regular burns. Centuries ago, indigenous people thoughtfully burned prairies to ensure the survival of the many fire dependent plants.  At Wolf Haven, The Center for Natural Lands Management (CNLM) manages and preforms prescribed burns on the prairie, keeping it healthy just as people did generations ago.

Camas

Camas

Many of the native plant species found in our South Sound prairies have great significance to people for their use as food or medicine. One of the showiest plants on the prairie is the common Camas, Camassia quamash a traditional food still being harvested and eaten today. The Camas produces an onion-like bulb that can be eaten after cooked and the periwinkle flowers cover prairies from late April to mid-May in a spectacular show.

Chocolate lily

The Chocolate Lily, Fritillaria affinis, also produces an edible bulb and has a unique blossom that resembles a dark brown tulip with bright yellow stamens and pistils that can be seen blooming April through May.

Early morning violet

Early morning violet

Another enchanting flower of the prairie is the early-blue Violet, Viola adunca. The short plant produces purple flowers that several butterfly and nectar eating species depend on.

Western serviceberry

Western serviceberry

Not only does the prairie provide edible bulbs and flowers but berries too! The Western serviceberry, Amelanchier alnifolia is a large shrub that blooms with spiky white flowers in the spring giving way to fat, dark purple berries at the end of summer.

Wolf Haven prairie sign

Interpretive signage guides you through our rare prairie.As we celebrate Native Plant Appreciation Week, let’s be sure to not only stop and smell the roses, but to look around and enjoy the wonders of our native plants!