Wolves & Wine 2019

Is it on your bucket list to visit the wolves at the McCleery Ranch in Montana and hear them howl?

Or perhaps, at long last, go on that safari to see the painted wolves of Africa?

You have the opportunity to win one, or both, of these adventures this year at Wolves & Wine 2019!

For the second year, Wolf Haven will offer a trip for two to our Bridger, Montana wolf sanctuary to see firsthand the famed “McCleery buffalo wolves”.

And this year, for the first time,  we have received a generous donation from Wilderness Safaris for a luxury safari adventure in Botswana, Africa.

Take a moment to see the difference Wilderness is making in eco-tourism – SEE VIDEO.

Come to Wolves & Wine prepared to bid for these and many other amazing items on September 28.

And if you cannot attend, you can still make a virtual donation that will be added to the evening’s total – DONATE

REALLY interested in being apart of the live auction, but cannot make the trip to Washington State? Contact us to see how you might still be able to participate.

Tickets on sale BUT GOING FAST – PURCHASE TICKET HERE or call 360.264.4695 x210.

It is going to be a GREAT night, for the wolves.

Wildlife Handling & Chemical Immobilization for Wildlife Professionals – CLASS FULL

The October 2019 Wildlife Handling & Chemical Immobilization for Wildlife Professionals course is now closed and no longer accepting applications. For information about future classes, contact Wendy Spencer, Director of Operations at Wolf Haven International.

This 3-day class is intended for wildlife agency personnel and other wildlife professionals. Taught by Dr. Mark Johnson of Global Wildlife Resources, it will take place October 22-24, with an optional free Monday workshop on October 21.

Classroom lecture and hands-on labs focus on the needs of researchers and managers to understand the skills and equipment associated with wildlife capture, physical restraint, and chemical immobilization. The course also covers each aspect of animal handling such a radio-collaring, weighing, sample collection and patient monitoring.

Includes course notebook and labs each day. Participants  receive a Certificate of Training upon course completion.

Student examining wolf during lab.

Student examining wolf during lab.

Course content includes:

  • Five-step preparation for field operations
  • Legal responsibilities
  • Professionalism
  • Drug delivery systems
  • Immobilizing drugs
  • Patient monitoring
  • Marking sampling
  • Veterinary emergencies
  • Euthanasia
  • Human safety
  • Ethical issues
  • Honoring each animal through equipment and techniques

About Global Wildlife Resources, Inc.
Global Wildlife Resources, Inc. (GWR) is a progressive organization dedicated to supporting wildlife professionals and bringing honor, care, and respect to those animals affected by research and management by:

  1. Promoting and improving animal welfare (in a non-prescriptive manner) in programs and activities relating to wildlife research and management.
  2. Teaching the highest quality courses in wildlife capture, chemical immobilization and handling.
  3. Providing professional preparation and field assistance with wildlife captures, transport, and disease investigations.

 

Un lugar para los lobos en la naturaleza/A place for wolves in the wild

This article was originally published in the Summer 2019 issue of the bilingual environmental publication ECO-Lógica. Reprinted here with permission.

A place for wolves in the wild – Un lugar para los lobos

by Pamela Maciel, Sanctuary Co-Manager, Mexican Wolf Specialist, Wolf Haven International

 

Sanctuary in the Pacific Northwest – Pacific Roots Magazine

London enjoys his tub

London enjoys his tub

In 1982, the sanctuary that was to eventually become Wolf Haven International was founded in Tenino, Washington. A beacon for wolf advocacy, Wolf Haven International also provides a lifetime home for displaced and captive born wolves and promotes wolf restoration in historical ranges.

July World of Wolves – Summer shedding season

Fence growing fur?

Fence growing fur?

As the season changed from spring to summer, so did the wolves’ appearance. Here at Wolf Haven, we are cycling through another lengthy season of shedding, and all the animals’ undercoats are falling off, tuft by tuft.

10 American Animal Sanctuaries You Should See – The Travel

Annie Marie Musselman photo

Annie Marie Musselman photo

Wolf Haven International is included in this list of 10 animal sanctuaries in the United States that both kids and parents can enjoy.

Wolves & Wine 2019

Wolf Haven’s annual fall fundraiser and annual meeting, Wolves & Wine offers guests and supporters an opportunity to share their passion for wolves and our mission: To conserve and protect wolves and their habitat. This evening of fun offers both silent and live auctions, beer and wine tastings, plentiful hors d’oeuvres and a chance to mingle with fellow wildlife supporters.

Speaking in Spanish about Lobos and Nature

Breathtaking scenery

Breathtaking scenery/Photo credit: USFWS

by Christopher Montero,  Outreach Coordinator, Wolf Haven International

“Do you think there are wolves in these mountains?” the young man asked, pointing to the snow-covered peaks around Lake Wenatchee. “Well…for sure about 30 or 40 miles South”, I answered.

“So, no wolves here?” he kept pressing.

I thought about it for a second, then I said: “I bet there are dispersing wolves moving up and down these mountains, seeking a partner or a new pack. Who knows? Maybe there is a curious wolf sniffing us from up there, at this very moment,” I pointed with my chin to the distance.  “¡Qué chido!” (Cool!) he replied… and his eyes got wider.

Spending time with nature.

Spending time with nature/Photo credit: USFWS

Those are the moments I feel I have accomplished something good.

I had similar conversations with different audiences around the Snoqualmie National Forest. But what was especially significant about this interaction, was that it was entirely in Spanish.  It happened early this April at an event called Camp Biota.

Chris talks to students outside

Chris talks to students outside/Photo credit: USFWS

Camp Biota is a science camp geared towards migrant middle-schoolers. What makes this experience even more special, is that these Latino teens were selected because of their low scores in math and science.  The idea is to kindle their interest in natural sciences and inspire them to learn more.  During a whole week, the students participated in hands-on experiences on field data-collection, talks, experiments and outdoor activities. Camp Biota is the result of a collaboration between the Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery and the North Central Educational Service District and it involves thirteen organizations, including Wolf Haven International.

Chris and Pam in the classroom.

Chris and Pam in the classroom/Photo credit: USFWS

This was the second year I was invited to participate as an instructor at Camp Biota and this time we were excited to include Pamela Maciel, Wolf Haven’s Sanctuary Co-Manager and Mexican Wolf SSP Liaison.  A significant portion of the students at Camp Biota were girls, so it was empowering to see and hear a role-model like Pam, a migrant Latina who has a solid background in sciences and biology.

Ecology hike

Ecology hike/Photo credit: USFWS

Being part of Camp Biota was immensely satisfying for Pam and me.  We supported activities and nature hikes, facilitated field data collection, gave talks and even translated to Spanish in real-time.  Most of students spoke and understood English with no problem, but connecting with these teens in our mother tongue went beyond sharing our passion for wolves, animals or conservation…it was about making a difference while honoring our unique cultural identities.

Chris & Pam with Bioteca students.

Chris & Pam with Biota students/Photo credit: USFWS

Teaching conservation in different countries have shown me that cultural diversity has a lot in common with biological diversity: both generate richer and more beautiful interactions and that’s the base for more resilient communities and systems.

That’s why Pam and I love to teach in Spanish.